Have you ever wondered in your childhood about God, religion or what are these things the elders talk about? Or does your kids stump you by asking about such concepts?

I have often wondered how such complexities of life can be presented in a simple manner to the kids. And bang! I bump with the book The Nameless God by Savie Karnel.

I decided to buy this book as a gift for my niece and ended up reading it myself. And I do not regret a bit. Yes, she will receive it when we meet after the lockdown, but in the mean time let me devour it.

This beautiful story about friendship and kindness in the backdrop of 1992 riot gives us an innocent view point to the religious differences.

I always love books from point of view of kids and this book was no exception. As we embark on the adventure with Bachhu, Noor and Seema, this book gives us an useful insight to our complicated world. The book is a prefect combination of well-defined characters, engaging storyline and a strong underlying message. The main protagonists, some ten year old kids and how they discover their own God and survive the atrocities of a burning city through their bravery is the plot. It also has a cute three legged dog(reminded me of the poem from Sarabhai vs Sarabhai), Kangaaroo.
The book written in a simple language and mostly as conversations between the children will help the young readers to acquaint with the story more. This is an ideal read for kids aged 9 to 14, in my opinion. But, it can entice adults too(example – me).

However the book is not without some shortcomings.

First the POVs. Some chapters are in the voice of Bachhu, some in Noor’s voice but there is no demarcation, which can be confusing.

Secondly, it becomes preachy at places but, I can understand with the topic in hand it is difficult to stay completely away from that part.

Having said that, the pros outweigh these small grouses hands down.
The storytelling is gripping and keeps the reader hooked.

The concept of the ‘nameless’ God is both unique and warm. You have to read the book to know about it more.

Nostalgic description of the 90s life, the TV with only one channel and the gadget free life of the kids, who prays for holidays, added to the flavour.

The historical events were stitched neatly with smartly explained anecdotes that never paced down the story.

The book in its simple terms describe the terms, religion, God, and atheism and I really appreciate the author for that.

Above all the book celebrates the innocence of childhood friendship which cannot be polluted by the polluted societal norms. I absolutely recommend this book for adults and young readers for a fresh perspective in this religion driven world.

The book is available in Amazon The Nameless God

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